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Woodbridge man charged with child endangerment after toddler’s car crash death

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A northern Virginia man has been charged with child endangerment after a 2-year-old died while riding unrestrained on his lap when his car crashed into two trucks in July.

SPRINGFIELD, Va. (AP) — A northern Virginia man has been charged with child endangerment after a 2-year-old died while riding unrestrained on his lap when his car crashed into two trucks in July.

Fairfax County police said Monday that they charged 41-year-old Jamaal Lowery of Woodbridge, with child endangerment, reckless driving and driving without a license.

The crash occurred July 29. Lowery was driving a 2007 Lincoln Town Car on Backlick Road in Springfield. Police said he crashed into a traffic pole when he drifted into the median at an intersection. The Town Car then struck two pickup trucks, including a head-on collision with a Ford F-350 that rolled backwards onto a 2018 Mercedes.

The child — who police said had been riding on Lowery’s lap — died 13 days after the crash on Aug. 11. There was no car seat in the vehicle, and by state law, children are supposed to be in a child safety seat.

Police say Virginia law bars them from disclosing whether the child was related to Lowery, who was hospitalized for his injuries. His mugshot shows a large scar and stitches on his forehead from the accident.

Lowery was arrested Thursday and is being held at the county jail without bond.

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Crime

Arlington Co. plans to change rules on how it interacts with ICE

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Arlington County, Virginia, has released a framework for updating policies around undocumented immigrants in hopes to sow trust in the county government.

Arlington County, Virginia, has released a framework for updating policies around undocumented immigrants in the hopes of sowing trust in the county government.

County Board President Matt de Ferranti said the new policies look to reaffirm access to county services for undocumented immigrants. They will also likely change how local law enforcement works with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

De Ferranti told WTOP that the framework covers three areas.

The first is protecting the information of immigrants. “Unless legally required to, which is very limited,” de Ferranti said, “we’re not requesting immigrant status.”

Second, the framework reaffirms that all residents, regardless of immigration status, will have access to county services.

Most notably, the board could change the policy of when county police contact ICE.

The current code says that Arlington police should only contact ICE under the following circumstances:

  • The subject has been arrested for a felony.
  • The subject has been arrested for a terrorism-related offense or is suspected of involvement in terrorism.
  • The subject has been arrested for suspected trafficking of other undocumented immigrants.
  • The arresting officer finds through a check that there is an active ICE detainer; that officer must notify a supervisor of their intention to make an arrest.
  • The subject is suspected of criminal street gang activity, which must be be confirmed by the Gang Unit.

Under the proposed framework, ICE would not be contacted after a non-violent felony charge.

“If it’s minor shoplifting that could reach the level of a felony — because the felony threshold is still too low, in my view and in our view, in Virginia — that might be a case where we would not raise it to the level of Immigrant and Customs Enforcement,” said de Ferranti. “That issue is really about focusing on guardianship and safety for everyone in our community, rather than distracting or catching up individuals who might have shoplifted.”

The board president said the aim of the framework is to “make sure that we’re not in the business of enforcing, in any cases, federal immigration law, which is the responsibility of the federal government. We want to … be even tighter and more narrow, so that we’re not inadvertently, through our processes, getting any individuals caught up with our system unless federal and state law require that we do so.”

De Ferranti said he and the board decided to look at updating these policies after speaking with immigrant advocacy groups and Arlington Police Chief Charles Penn, who de Ferranti said “wants to tighten up and really focus our processes on guardianship.”

The board president will likely use Fairfax County’s Trust policy as a model moving forward.

The Arlington County Board will accept feedback over the next month, with plans to update the rules by the end of the year.

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Crime

‘Devious licks’ social media challenge prompts vandalism in DC-area schools

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Vandalism inspired by a TikTok trend called “devious licks” is leaving a bad aftertaste among school administrators nationwide, including some in the D.C. area.

The latest back-to-school trend, courtesy of TikTok, is leaving school administrators across the country frustrated, including some in the D.C. area.

The “devious licks” challenge recently went viral on social media, inspiring students to steal or vandalize school property and post their exploits on TikTok.

Much of the vandalism and thefts have occurred in school bathrooms — a trend that prompted the principal of a Prince William County, Virginia, high school to warn that students will be disciplined for their actions.

“Last Friday, we experienced significant vandalism in our boys’ bathrooms, which included removing soap bags from soap dispensers to place them in the toilet, stuffing the toilets with paper towels, throwing trash throughout the bathroom, and stealing items from the bathrooms,” Lisamarie Kane, principal of Osbourn Park High School in Manassas, wrote in a letter Monday.

She said the school had to close some of the bathrooms but will reopen them Tuesday “with an extensive monitoring plan to help prevent this vandalism from occurring.”

Diana Gulotta, spokeswoman for Prince William County Schools, told WTOP that any students involved would be disciplined according to the county’s code of behavior.

Damage has also been reported at Falls Church High School and Rocky Run Middle School in Fairfax County.

“We are aware of several incidents of damage to school property related to a troubling TikTok challenge. Disciplinary action has and will be taken against those who participate in this behavior as part of our Students Rights and Responsibilities,” Fairfax County Public Schools spokeswoman Julie Moult said in an email.

Loudoun County Public Schools said it had some minor incidents related to the challenge but that there was no substantial damage.

D.C. Public Schools told WTOP that it has not seen any incidents. WTOP has contacted Montgomery and Prince George’s County schools in Maryland for comment.

Across the country, some students have been arrested and charged in connection to the challenge. Administrators are also warning that students could be suspended or forced to pay restitution for any damage they cause.

A spokesperson for TikTok said the social media platform was removing “devious licks” content and redirecting hashtags to its guidelines to discourage the behavior and that it doesn’t allow content that “promotes or enables criminal activities.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Loudoun County woman dies after alleged domestic assault involving hammer

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A woman whom the Loudoun County, Virginia, Sheriff’s Office said was assaulted by her husband earlier this month has died.

A woman whom the Loudoun County, Virginia, Sheriff’s Office said was assaulted by her husband earlier this month has died.

Regina Redman-Lollobrigido, 44, died Sunday night from injuries suffered when her husband, Peter Lollobrigido, 49, hit her with a hammer in their apartment in the Stone Spring Apartments, on Glasscock Field Drive, in Sterling, Sept. 19.

Peter Lollobrigido was arrested at the time and charged with attempted murder, aggravated malicious wounding and violation of a protective order. The case is now being investigated as a homicide, and the sheriffs said more charges are pending.

He’s being held at the Loudoun County Adult Detention Center without bond.

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