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What Happens Inside Your Stomach When You Eat Instant Noodles?

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What Happens Inside Your Stomach When You Eat Instant Noodles?

A popular ready-made meal, instant noodles are the first choice of those in need for time or money, especially college students. Even if you don’t think they are as bad as other fast food (burgers, fries, burritos etc.), you might take a different stand after you read this.

Dr. Braden Kuo of Massachusetts General Hospital conducted a first-of-its-kind experiment to discover what happens in your stomach and digestive tract after you eat instant noodles (ramen noodles, to be more specific) by using a pill-sized camera. The findings were shocking…

Ramen Noodles Don’t Break Down After Hours of Digestion

The video above shows ramen noodles inside of a stomach two hours after consumption. Even then, they are still intact, unlike the homemade ramen noodles used for comparison. This is a matter of concern for several reasons.

For one thing, it puts additional pressure on your digestive system because it is made to work for hours in order to dissolve the highly processed food, which is rather ironic as most processed food lacks fiber and gets broken down quite fast.

But, when food remains in the stomach for so long, it affects the body absorption of nutrients as well. Still, in the case of processed ramen noodles, there’s very little nutrition to be absorbed, but rather, a lot of additives, including the toxic preservative tertiary-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ).

If this additive stays in the digestive tract for so long together with the hard-to-break-down noodles, you can only assume what it can do to your health.

Five Grams of Noodle Preservative, TBHQ, Is Lethal

Although TBHQ, a byproduct of petroleum, is often referred to as “antioxidant,” it’s important to understand that it is a synthetic chemical with antioxidant properties, rather than a natural antioxidant. It’s added in many foods, ranging from crackers to crisps to fast foods, to increase shelf life by preventing oxidation of fats and oils. It is commonly found in McDonald’s chicken nuggets, Kellogg’s CHEEZ-IT crackers, Reese’s peanut butter cups, Wheat Thins crackers, Teddy Grahams, Red Baron frozen pizza, Taco Bell beans, and many more.

It is also added to varnishes, lacquers, and pesticide products, as well as cosmetics and perfumes to increase stability and decrease the evaporation rate.

At its 19th and 21st meetings, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives decided that TBHQ was safe for human consumption at levels of 0-0.5 mg/kg of body weight.

But, the Codex commission set the maximum acceptable limits up to between 100 – 400mg/kg, depending on the food it’s added to. Thus, chewing gum is allowed to contain the highest levels of TBHQ. According to the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration, TBHQ must not surpass 0.02% of its oil and fat content.

As there’s an apparent inconsistency in these allegedly “safe” limits, the best option is to have little or no exposure to this toxicant. According to a Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives exposure to five grams can be lethal and, and exposure to just one gram of TBHQ can cause:

Delirium
Sense of suffocation
Nausea and vomiting
Ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
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Although TBHQ is not a persistent toxicant, which means your body will most likely get rid of it so that it doesn’t bioaccumulate, when you consume it through instant noodles, your body might be receiving prolonged exposures. According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), health risks associated with TBHQ based on animal studies include:

Liver effects at very low doses
Positive mutation results from in vitro tests on mammalian cells
Biochemical changes at very low doses
Reproductive effects at high doses
Eating Instant Noodles Linked to Metabolic Syndrome

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition discovered that women who consumed more instant noodles were at a considerably higher risk of metabolic syndrome as opposed to those who ate less, regardless of their overall diet or workout routine.

68% of women who ate instant noodles more than twice a week stood greater chances of getting metabolic syndrome, which is a group of symptoms including central obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting blood sugar, elevated fasting triglycerides, and low levels of HDL cholesterol.

What’s more, having three or more of these symptoms puts you at a higher risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Even past research examining overall nutrient intake between instant-noodle consumers and non-consumers confirmed that instant noodles contribute little to a healthy diet.

The instant-noodle consumers had a considerably lower intake of vital nutrients like protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, vitamin A, niacin, and vitamin C in comparison with non-consumers. On the other hand, they had an excessive intake of energy, unhealthy fats and sodium (just one package may contain 2,700 milligrams of sodium).

What Else Is in a Package of Instant Noodles?

Except for huge amounts of sodium and the preservative TBHQ, what else does a typical serving of instant noodles contain? As reported by Prevent Disease:

“The dried noodle block was originally created by flash frying cooked noodles, and this is still the main method used in Asian countries, though air-dried noodle blocks are favored in Western countries. The main ingredients of the dried noodle are wheat flour, palm oil, and salt. Common ingredients of the flavoring powder are salt, monosodium glutamate, seasoning, and sugar.

…In June 2012, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) found Benzopyrene (a cancer-causing substance) in six brands of noodles made by Nong Shim Company Ltd. Although the KFDA said the amounts were minuscule and not harmful, Nong Shim did identify particular batches of noodles with a problem, prompting a recall by October 2012.”

One sufficient reason to avoid instant noodles is the presence of monosodium glutamate (MSG), an excitotoxin that overexcites the nerve cells to the point of damage or death, causing various degrees of brain dysfunction and damage, and potentially even prompting or worsening learning disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and more.

In fact, MSG is approximately 78% free glutamic acid, which is the same neurotransmitter used by your brain, nervous system, eyes, pancreas, and other organs initiate certain processes in your body. But, MSG is the ideal obesity drug as mice for scientific study are fattened up with it. So, if you’re striving to maintain your ideal body weight, you should avoid MSG at all cost.

Return to Whole, Living Foods for Optimal Health

Even though eating a package of instant noodles from time to time won’t necessarily kill you, the real problem occurs when processed food replaces real food and instant noodles are a perfect example of the type of processed food you should avoid as much as possible, as overindulging (having instant noodles at least twice a week) will unquestionably affect your health and weight.

The high content of sugar, fructose, refined carbohydrates, and artificial ingredients, as opposed to the low content of nutrients and fiber is what makes processed foods the ideal means for weight gain and chronic disease. Not only are processed foods addictive and designed to make you overeat, but they also stimulate excessive food cravings, resulting in weight gain. Plus, they trigger insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, both of which are signs of most chronic and/or serious diseases. This shouldn’t come as a surprise because people have grown well on vegetables, meats, eggs, fruits, and other whole foods for centuries, whereas processed foods are only a recent invention.

Cutting processed foods out of your diet calls for advance meal planning, but if done step-by-step, it’s quite possible, and manageable. For one thing, you can try exploring your local farmer’s markets for in-season produce that is priced to sell, and plan your meals accordingly. You can also do this with supermarket sales. What you can generally do is plan a week of meals at a time, ensuring you have all the necessary ingredients at hand, do any prep work ahead of time so that dinner is easy to prepare if you’re short of time.

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Jury finds former NASA executive guilty in shooting death of Springfield neighbor

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A former NASA executive who is accused of shooting his neighbor in Springfield, Virginia, with whom he had an ongoing dispute, has been found guilty of first-degree murder.

A former NASA executive who is accused of shooting his neighbor in Springfield, Virginia, with whom he had an ongoing dispute, has been found guilty of first-degree murder.

Michael Hetle, 52, was found guilty of shooting Javon Prather, 24, seven times. The shooting was captured by a Ring doorbell camera.

Hetle claimed he feared for his life when Prather came knocking on the door of his home, but prosecutors called it a coldblooded execution.

Fairfax County Commonwealth’s Attorney Steve Descano said the evidence was pretty clear and the jury agreed that it was “not self-defense, that it was murder in the first degree, which is murder with malice and murder with premeditation.”

Although the facts would have come out one way or the other, Descano said that being able to show the jury what happened from the video footage was a big part of getting the murder conviction.

“Being able to actually show the jury what happened and actually being able to show the demeanor and the seven shots I think really brought home to the jury the malice of getting this first-degree murder conviction,” Descano said.

Hetle was also found guilty of using a weapon in commission of a felony.

Descano said that while the verdict will not return Prather — who had served in the Maryland National Guard — to his loved ones, he hoped that the conviction brings Prather’s family some “small measure of peace.”

Hetle and Prather had simmering disputes since 2016, with Hetle repeatedly complaining and calling police about barking dogs and loud music.

Descano said that evidence submitted during trial revealed that “racial animus was a contributing factor” in Hetle’s actions, citing evidence from Hetle’s son about how the defendant referred to Prather and his wife, among other things that Descano said the jury found compelling.

“The message that I would have to the community is to remember that we all are one community. We all live here together, and Fairfax County is one. We should continue to remember that,” Descano said.

Hetle’s sentencing is scheduled on Jan. 28, 2022, and Descano said he is planning to seek a life sentence.

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Time served for man who threatened Trump with package he said was ‘detonator’

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Jean-Paul Gamarra, 41, of New York, has been sentenced on charges of threatening then-President Donald Trump and the White House complex in March 2017. He gave an officer a package he claimed had a “detonator” in it. It was a Bluetooth keyboard.

A man from Long Island, New York, has been sentenced on charges of threatening then-President Donald Trump and the White House complex during a March 2017 incident.

Jean-Paul Gamarra, 45, of Copiague, was sentenced Thursday after being found guilty on May 27, 2021, of one count each of “threats to the president and threatening and conveying false information concerning the use of an explosive” following a trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, according to the Justice Department.

Gamarra, who has been in custody for 41 months, was sentenced to time served, which the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia said “is an effective sentence at the higher end of the applicable guidelines range.”

Under U.S. District Judge John D. Bates’ sentencing order, Gamarra will be placed on three years of supervised release.

During that period, Gamarra has to stay away from the White House, maintain mental health treatment, cooperate with the Secret Service in assessing his future risk and avoid all physical and online contact with anyone the Secret Service protects.

On the morning of March 28, 2017, Gamarra approached a uniformed, on-duty Secret Service officer a pedestrian access gate on Pennsylvania Avenue, within 100 yards of the White House.

As established at trial, he presented the officer with a package, stating it contained a “nuclear bomb detonator” that was being presented for “safekeeping.”

“Warning this is a tre threat on the President and Senator life” and “Warning 100% threat Brand New Electronic Detonator Device,” were handwritten on the package along with Gamarra’s name and address.

In response, the Secret Service cleared the surrounding area, including the north fence line of the White House, Lafayette Park and other areas near 15th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue.

People inside nearby buildings were told to shelter in place while the D.C. police department’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit evaluated the package.

The package was declared “safe” and the area reopened after approximately 90 minutes, as the package contained a Bluetooth keyboard and letter.

Gamarra was arrested at the scene and was in custody until August 2020, according to a Justice Department news release.

Previously In 2014, Gamarra was interviewed by members of the Secret Service regarding threats to then-President Barack Obama.

The Justice Department said he admitted threatening Obama in order to gain the “attention” of the Secret Service so he could “expose” “corruption.”

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2 Maryland pet stores banned from selling puppies

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Two Maryland pet stores that specialize in puppy sales will no longer be allowed to sell animals and the owner is facing a $500,000 civil penalty after reaching an agreement with the state attorney general.

Two Maryland pet stores that specialize in puppy sales will no longer be allowed to sell animals, and the owner is facing a $500,000 civil penalty after reaching an agreement with the state attorney general.

Just Puppies retail pet stores in Rockville and Towson, along with the stores’ owner, Mitchell Thomson, were charged in June with violating two state laws – the No More Puppy-Mills Act and the Consumer Protection Act — in their practice of selling puppies.

“The settlement prevents Just Puppies from selling dogs in Maryland, provides restitution to Maryland consumers who purchased puppies that had a congenital disorder or hereditary condition or illness at the time of purchase, and imposes civil penalties,” according to a statement Friday from the office of Attorney General Brian Frosh.

The No More Puppy-Mills Act bans the sale of dogs and cats by retail pet stores, in an effort to curb the sourcing of animals from irresponsible breeders.

Frosh’s office contends that the stores misled consumers about their relationships with breeders and continued to sell puppies after the City of Rockville revoked the store’s pet shop license.

“This settlement resolves allegations that Just Puppies and its owner violated laws intended to protect animals from irresponsible breeding and mistreatment,” Frosh said in the statement. “Consumers who were misled by Just Puppies and purchased sick dogs will get their money back or receive compensation to help pay for their pet’s care.”

As part of the settlement, Just Puppies has agreed to refund payments to customers who purchased dogs with certain conditions since Jan. 1, 2020 — the day the No More Puppy-Mills Act went into effect — or pay for treatment of certain conditions.

The settlement also requires Just Puppies to pay a civil penalty of up to $500,000, but the fine could be reduced to $100,000 if the company complies with the remedies in the agreement.

Consumers who are eligible for refunds will be contacted by the Attorney General’s Office. Consumers can also call the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division at 410-576-6569 with questions.

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