Ryan Montes San Elizario

Snow Blankets San Elizario

Snow covered the Borderland and San Elizario. Ryan Montes shares this report on our odd weather.

By Ryan Montes

Phots By Steven Zimmerman and Ryan Montes

On Tuesday evening and early Wednesday morning, San Elizario and El Paso residents were thrilled to see a late Christmas gift from the weather, snow blanketing their front yards, backyards, trees, you name it. For El Paso, heavy snowfall is a big deal. A major snowstorm that results in about an inch of accumulation is rare, with the last one being around this time of year in 2016. However, just like having snowfall is a beautiful form of nature, it’s also a road hazard for anyone driving. Sleet and black ice are caused by snow. If you drive to fast during snowy weather, you have a high risk of sliding off the road or getting into an accident. What’s the best way to avoid these hazards? It’s simple, don’t go out at all.

The first reports of snow falling in any part of the city were around nine o’clock to ten o’clock from all of the local news stations during their evening news segments. Then, every social media platform blew up with photos and videos of snow falling in different parts of El Paso and San Elizario. It turned into a winter wonderland within hours. In San Elizario, the gazebo that sits in the heart of Veterans Square, or simply the “Placita” by the presidio, had snow on its roof. The tree branches nearby were outlined with snow, giving it a postcard type of look. The weather, in general, that evening could’ve made your entire body feel numb and feel like you were getting frostbite, especially your hands.

 For the most part, El Paso’s weather in the first two months of 2020 has been a mixture of normal and out of the ordinary. It’s been normal because temperatures in the evenings have been pretty chilly, but it’s also been a bit out of the ordinary due to daytime temperatures reaching a bit higher than usual into the 70’s. The above-average temperatures could be a result of global warming. Once the winter weather departs, we then get the dust storms in the spring from around March to April, then monsoon season creeps in around May and it goes into full effect from June until around September. Lastly, autumn and fall arrive around August until December then the cycle starts over with winter.

When will the next snowstorm arrive in the Sun City? Hopefully, it won’t be too long but then again, who knows? We have another system moving into the borderland next week so that could determine if we get any snowfall but don’t get your hopes too high, keep those fingers crossed.

Photos by Ryan Montes

Photos by Steven Zimmerman

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